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Hungary Country Information

Once a part of the forboding "Communist Bloc", today's Hungary is a traveler's delight, with low prices, breathtaking squares, stunning sights, a fascinating history, and a treasure trove of unexpected surprises. Situated in the very heart of Europe, this kidney-shaped country boasts of one of the world's most beautiful cities, Budapest, which is called the "Pearl of the Danube". While Budapest, the mighty Magyar capital has much to offer: the Szechenyi Thermal Baths, the Hungarian Parliament, Great Synagogue, and Heroes' Square, the larger-than-life relics from the communist era at Memento Park and the picturesque walks along the Danube, let us guide you to the path less travelled. Prathvi can arrange for a day trip to the Danube Bend; to Central Europe's largest fresh water lake, Lake Balaton; to the tanya vilag (farm world) of the Southern Plain; to the Villany Hills in Southern Transdanubia covered in vineyards; to powerboat and jet ski on Lake Tisza; the traditional Orseg region in the far west or to the Eger-Tokaj region, which showcases the country's highest mountain, the smallest village, the first Hungarian language bible from the 16th century, and the oldest railway from the 19th century.

Prathvi will create a delightful itinerary that will allow you to explore this underrated tourist destination, where 2000 year old Roman ruins and 400 year old Turkish monuments can be found side by side.

History & Culture
Hungary is a democratic republic. It joined the European Union on 1 May 2004. It became a member of NATO on 12 March 1999. Hungary completely transformed itself politically and economically in the 1990s.

Hungarians are deeply attached to their national, cultural and linguistic heritage.

The culture of Hungary has a distinctive style of its own in Hungary, diverse and varied, starting from the capital city of Budapest on the Danube, to the Great Plain bordering Ukraine. Hungary of today was formerly (until 1918) part of the Austro-Hungarian empire. Hungary has a rich folk tradition, for example: embroideries, decorated potterys, buildings and carvings. Hungarian music ranges from the rhapsodies of Franz Liszt to folk music and Hungarian gipsy music and Roma music. Hungary has a rich and colorful literature, with many poets and writers, although not many are well known abroad due to the limited prevalence of the Hungarian language being a Finno-Ugric language. Some noted authors include Sandor Marai and Imre Kertesz, who have been gaining acclaim in recent decades. Janos Kodolanyi was more known in the middle of the twentieth century in Italy and Finland. Imre Kertesz won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2002. Peter Esterhazy is known and popular in Austria and Germany, and Magda Szabo has become well-known in Europe recently as well. A well-known Hungarian-originated author was Arthur Koestler.

History
Hungarians are deeply attached to their national, cultural and linguistic heritage.

Longer Historical Perspective
The ancestors of ethnic Hungarians were the Magyar tribes, who moved into the Carpathian Basin in 896, conquering the people already in the region. Hungary became a Christian Kingdom under St Stephen in the year 1000. Much of Hungary fell under Turkish domination from the early 16th until the late 17th century. Thereafter, the country came under Habsburg rule. This lasted until 1918 - although from the establishment of the dual Austrian-Hungarian monarchy in 1867 onwards, Hungary enjoyed broad autonomy and a golden period.

Recent History
Hungary was on the losing side of both World Wars. At the end of the first, Hungary lost two-thirds of its territory under the 1920 Treaty of Trianon, leaving large numbers of ethnic Hungarians in Romania (c. 1.5 million), Slovakia (c. 550,000), Serbia and Montenegro (c. 350,000) and the Ukraine (c. 150,000). After the Second World War, the Communists gained complete control by 1948, despite the low level of support for Communism in Hungary. Stalin's death and Khrushchev's denunciation of him brought about a crisis in Hungary and led to the 1956 Uprising, which was suppressed by Soviet troops. After an initial period of oppression, from 1961 the new Communist leader, Kadar, instituted a platform of national reconciliation and then in 1968 introduced new radical economic reforms unparalleled in any other communist country. These led to a gradual improvement in living standards, a relaxation of the domestic atmosphere and improved relations with the West. But there was no parallel relaxation of the Communist grip on political life.

World Health Organisation (WHO), World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO), World Meteorological Organisation (WMO), World Trade Organisation (WTO).

Hungary is a democratic republic. It joined the European Union on 1 May 2004. It became a member of NATO on 12 March 1999. Hungary completely transformed itself politically and economically in the 1990s.

 

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